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Namiko Kitaura

Namiko Kitaura – art and nature

“I use photography as a medium to express catharsis. It is a purification and distillation of sentiment through image.”

Ambiguity and subtlety are at the core of her work. She produces distintive images with a strong, personal voice with use of a unique Japanese view towards nature and the relationship between life and nature. The implied Romanticism within her works is both abstract and absolute. Through anonymous subjects such as plants, landscapes, human skin, the images contemplate each other sensually, with a sense of graceful motion suspended in a non-temporal framework.
With her unique techniques, Namiko aims to visualize the almost invisible aspects of the human condition that lie below the physical, and their juxtaposition in a symbolic and metaphorical way: passion in depression, comfort in sadness, tranquility in chaos and beauty in ugliness. Her main theme has been related to people’s DNA level memories, the transience of life, and beauty of this transience.

The art of Namiko Kitaura

Namiko Kitaura talks about her vision to our magazine: “My work is greatly influenced by the traditional Japanese concept of nature, yet interpreted as an artistically created void – representing both symbolism and simplicity as aesthetic speculation, corollary to my concept of mimesis. In traditional Japanese aesthetics, as with my work, the distance between art and nature is very close. This spiritual relationship celebrates objects for not only their aesthetic value but also the intense poetic sentiments that they evoke, as in true love for flowers, not so much for their fragrance and color, as for their form and emotional import.
In Japanese culture, nature has historically been not only an object of aesthetic appreciation but also an agent evoking intense poetic sentiments. Flowers are loved not only for their fragrance and color but also their form and emotional import.

Namiko Kitaura art
The Japanese concept of nature allows that human beings shall not be considered as superior or opposed to nature, rather embedded in, or “one with” nature, defined by the belief in the existence of a spiritual life in natural objects, natural phenomena, and the universe itself – capable of exercising influence on human beings. Indeed, the Japanese term for nature literally means “from itself thus it is”, expressing a state of being rather than the existence of a natural order.
My work encourage the audience to pause for a moment to explore their own truths through engaging with the my imagery.”

 

namikokitaura.com

 

 

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